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Employee Orientation: How to Energize, Integrate, and Retain Your Newest Hires
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What Overtime Violations Are Lurking in Your Timekeeping System?

An audit “is the cheapest insurance policy you will ever buy,” says attorney Tammy D. McCutchen, speaking recently at a SHRM Annual Conference and Exposition. McCutchen is former administrator of the Wage and Hour Division at the Department of Labor and a principal at Littler Mendelson, PC.

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New notice and poster for paid sick leave

As most employers in California already know, the Healthy Workplaces/Healthy Families Act of 2014 allows employees to take up to 3 days of paid sick leave each year, beginning July 1, 2015.  Although employees can’t begin using paid sick leave until July, the notice and posting provisions of the law are effective January 1, 2015 and the California Department of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE) has issued a new poster summarizing employee’s rights under the new law, along with an updated “Notice to Employee” required under Labor Code section 2810.5.  The poster and the notice are available on the DLSE’s website.  The poster must be displayed in the workplace by January 1, 2015 and employers must provide the revised notice to employees hired after January 1, 2015.

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Remote Workers—Alternatives for the Authorized Representative

Yesterday, we presented attorney John Nahajzer’s advice for employers fulfilling I-9 duties for remote employees with local notaries. Today, alternatives to notaries. Nahajzer is the managing shareholder of law firm Maggio+Kattar.

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I-9 Compliance and Remote Employees: Physical Presence or Notary?

Today, attorney John Nahajzer offers advice for employers fulfilling I-9 duties for remote employees with local notaries. Nahajzer is the managing shareholder of law firm Maggio+Kattar.

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Free Report Friday—Paying Overtime on Bonuses: A Calculation Guide

If you have a nondiscretionary bonus plan that is awarded to nonexempt employees at intervals greater than each week (for example, on a quarterly, semiannual, or annual basis), you are required to retroactively calculate the bonus into the employee’s “regular rate” of pay.

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